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GTX 1050 Ti x 3 Overclocking Showdown vs. RX 460

Intro

This overclocking showdown focuses on three GTX 1050 Tis and one RX 460 4GB.  We are following up on last week’s PNY GTX 1050 Ti 4GB & GTX 1050 Ti XLR8 OC vs. the XFX RX 460 4GB evaluation as well as our stand alone evaluation of the EVGA GTX 1050 Ti SC.  Today, we have optimized our overclocks for each of our four cards with all performance options set to their upper limits to get the highest possible performance.

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XFX RX 460 with 6-pin PCIe connector (left), PNY GTX 1050 Ti (top), EVGA GTX 1050 Ti SC (bottom), PNY GTX 1050 Ti XLR8 with 6-pin PCIe connector (right). All cards have 4GB of vRAM.

What makes this overclocking showdown particularly interesting is that two of the cards use a 6-pin PCIe connection for additional power while the other two draw all of their power from the motherboard’s PCIe slot.  We measured total system average and peak power usage with each overclocked card to see if the cards with the extra power cable draw more power and/or overclock higher than the cards that are limited to 75W total from the PCIe slot.

At stock, the factory clocked PNY GTX 1050 Ti XLR8 won overall in performance over the factory overclocked EVGA GTX 1050 Ti SC.  The reference clocked PNY GTX 1050 Ti came in third place, and all three GTX 1050 Tis soundly beat the XFX factory clocked RX 460.  This time, we will overclock all of our cards as far as they each will go to see where they stand in relation to each other fully overclocked.

Overclocking the PNY GTX 1050 Ti

The $149 PNY GTX 1050 Ti is clocked at reference GTX 1050 Ti speeds of 1290MHz for the base clock and 1392MHz for the Boost clocks.  Without adjusting the fan speed nor adding extra voltage, we were able to add 285MHz to the core for a base clock of 1771MHz and Boost clocks which fluctuated between 1847MHz to 1885MHz.  All of the GTX 1050 Tis were able to hit peaks of 1911MHz which appears to be the ceiling for this GPU.   We added 450MHz to the memory clocks to reach 3953MHz.

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The PNY GTX 1050 Ti draws all of its power from the motherboard’s PCIe slot for a maximum of 75W.  Total system power draw averaged 118W and peaked at 133W as measured by our Kill A Watt meter.

Overclocking the EVGA GTX 1050 Ti SC

The $149 EVGA GTX 1050 Ti SC is factory clocked at 1354MHz base/1468 Boost.  It has a basic 3+1 Power Phase design and it draws all of its power from the PCIe slot.  The SC costs the same price as the PNY GTX 1050 Ti which is reference clocked at 1290MHz base/1392MHz boost.

Without adjusting the fan speed nor adding extra voltage, we were able to add 160MHz to the core for a base clock of 1769MHz and Boost clocks which fluctuated between 1835MHz to 1898MHz.  All of the GTX 1050 Tis were able to hit peaks of 1911MHz which appears to be the ceiling for this GPU.  We added 320MHz to the memory clocks to reach 3823MHz.dscn2147The EVGA GTX 1050 Ti SC draws all of its power from the motherboard’s PCIe slot for a maximum of 75W.  Total system power draw averaged 116W and peaked at 128W as measured by our Kill A Watt meter.

Overclocking the PNY GTX 1050 Ti XLR8

The $159 PNY GTX 1050 Ti is clocked at PNY factory speeds of 1290MHz for the base clock and 1392MHz for the Boost clocks. The PNY GTX 1050 Ti XLR8’s base clock is at 1366MHz core clock which is 76MHz over Nvidia’s reference clocks, and the Boost is 1480MHz, which is clocked 88MHz over Nvidia’s guaranteed boost.

Without adjusting the fan speed nor adding extra voltage, we were able to add 80MHz to the core for a rock solid Boost clock of 1911MHz which did not fluctuate.  Although all of the GTX 1050 Tis were able to hit peaks of 1911MHz which appears to be the ceiling for this GPU, the XLR8 edition evidently by virtue of its additional 6-pin PCIe connection was able to maintain this clock.   We added 500MHz to the memory clocks to reach 4004MHz.

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Since the PNY GTX 1050 Ti draws its power from the motherboard’s PCIe slot and has an additional connection to the PSU via a PCIe cable, the total system power draw was higher than the other two GTX 1050 Tis and it averaged 128W and peaked at 143W as measured by our Kill A Watt meter.

Overclocking the XFX RX 460 4GB

The $139 (now with a $20 mail-in-rebate at Newegg) XFX RX 460 is clocked at XFX factory clocked speeds of 1220MHz for the boost clock up 20MHz over reference clocks, and well over the 1090MHz for the base clock. max-oc

Unlike with the GTX 1050 Tis, we had to adjust the fan speed to 80% and we added .48mV extra voltage for stability and our maximum overclock.  Ultimately, we were able to add 80MHz to the core for a solid Boost clock of 1300MHz which did not fluctuate.  We added 190MHz to the memory clocks to reach 1940MHz, or 7760MHz effective clocks (up 760MHz over the 7000MHz reference memory clocks).

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The XFX RX 460 draws its power from the motherboard’s PCIe slot and has an additional connection to the PSU via a PCIe cable.  The total system power draw was higher than any of the GTX 1050 Tis and it averaged 130W and peaked at 168W as measured by our Kill A Watt meter.

Testing Platform

Our testing platform is Windows 10 Home 64-bit, using an Intel Core i7-6700K at 4.00GHz which turbos to 4.4GHz for all cores as set in the ASRock Z7170 motherboard’s BIOS, and 16GB of HyperX DDR4 at 3333MHz. The settings and hardware are identical except for the four cards being tested.

We also feature our newest 2016 games, Shadow Warrior 2 and Civilization VI, and we also include Ashes of the Singularity, Hitman, Rise of the Tomb Raider, and Total War Warhammer using DX12.  We have also added Futuremark’s DX12 benchmark, Time Spy.  We will compare the performance of 28 modern games at 1920×1080 resolution with maximum settings.

Before we run benchmarks, let’s check out the test configuration.