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Star Citizen to use Vulkan, not DX12
#1
Massive news. This is in addition to Bethesda working with AMD on Vulkan for its games. The wheels are finally starting to fall off of M$ and not before time either! Big Grin

https://forums.robertsspaceindustries.co...nt_7581676
Quote:Years ago we stated our intention to support DX12, but since the introduction of Vulkan which has the same feature set and performance advantages this seemed a much more logical rendering API to use as it doesn't force our users to upgrade to Windows 10 and opens the door for a single graphics API that could be used on all Windows 7, 8, 10 & Linux. As a result our current intention is to only support Vulkan and eventually drop support for DX11 as this shouldn't effect any of our backers. DX12 would only be considered if we found it gave us a specific and substantial advantage over Vulkan. The API's really aren't that different though, 95% of the work for these APIs is to change the paradigm of the rendering pipeline, which is the same for both APIs.

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Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

Homeopathy is what happened when snake oil salesmen discovered that water is cheaper than snake oil.
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#2
Wow. Amazing news.
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#3
I wouldn't be excited. This commenter on Neowin sums up Star Citizen:
Quote:This "game" is becoming another Duke Nukem.

I've been following it solidly for 6 months, and anyone who claims that this game is nearing completion or is ready for release is kidding themselves. Stuff like this article is actually reinforcing my point of view.

In a nutshell, when you design a game (or any software really), you have goals, then you stick to those goals. You can iterate beyond those goals when you're done achieving said goals, but to move the goalposts mid-play is bad. And almost every quarter, without fail, this game has moved the goalposts. It's designed to inspire new funders, but it never really gets to the end game.
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#4
Adopting Vulkan and favoring it over DX12 appears to be an emerging trend amongst developers and one I whole-heartedly approve of.

I'm sure each individual developer will have their own results and methods resulting from it, some may follow Duke Nukem Forever style development paths, that doesn't concern me, the overall trend does.

With PS4 dominating console sales this generation and most games written for console first it is little surprise that DirectX and M$ are on the nose and that developers are pursuing coding methods that are popular on the currently dominant machines.
Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

Homeopathy is what happened when snake oil salesmen discovered that water is cheaper than snake oil.
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#5
Can the Xbox One run Vulkan?
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#6
Of course, its gpu is GCN based like PS4's.

Its not if it can run Vulkan its whether or not M$ would allow it to run Vulkan (snowflakes hope in hell of that happening).
Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

Homeopathy is what happened when snake oil salesmen discovered that water is cheaper than snake oil.
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#7
This could be part of the reason why MS got into the console business. The Xbox One is a Trojan horse for Windows 10 and DX12.
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#8
No doubt. It's a pretty lame horse at the moment however.
Adam knew he should have bought a PC but Eve fell for the marketing hype.

Homeopathy is what happened when snake oil salesmen discovered that water is cheaper than snake oil.
Reply
#9
In a forum post, Cloud Imperium Games developer Ali Brown indicated that Star Citizen will be dropping DirectX support in favor of Vulkan, the cross-platform, low-level API put out by the Khronos Group—the industry group that's also behind the older OpenGL API. Specifically, Brown mentioned that CIG had been developing on DX11, with an intent to support DX12. However, because Vulkan enables single-API support for older version of Windows (and Linux) without sacrificing performance and features, the plan now is to move away from DirectX completely.

"Years ago we stated our intention to support DX12, but since the introduction of Vulkan which has the same feature set and performance advantages this seemed a much more logical rendering API to use as it doesn't force our users to upgrade to Windows 10 and opens the door for a single graphics API that could be used on all Windows 7, 8, 10 & Linux."

Brown clearly indicates that CIG is not in favor of Microsoft forcing everyone into a Windows 10 upgrade regimen. Knowing that many gamers still prefer to stay on Windows 7, this makes sense for CIG. But there is still a sliver of hope for future DX12 support.

"DX12 would only be considered if we found it gave us a specific and substantial advantage over Vulkan," Brown said. "The APIs really aren't that different though, 95% of the work for these APIs is to change the paradigm of the rendering pipeline, which is the same for both [DX12 and Vulkan]."

Developers have been slow on the uptake for DX12, and many have claimed that it's more difficult to program for DX12 than for DX11. Most new games coming out this year still rely solely on DX11 for graphics. Microsoft made an effort in revitalizing games for Windows with DX12's announcement coinciding with Windows 10, but forcing users to upgrade to Windows 10 to use DX12 at all has put a damper in the company's gaming vision.
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